Who are the Blessed? Reflecting on Luke 14:15-24

“Who Are the Blessed?”

In Chapter 14 of Luke’s Gospel, when a bystander comments that “those who will dine in the Kingdom of God are blessed,” Jesus furthers his insight about ‘the blessed’ by sharing the parabolic image of the Great Feast, in which all are invited.  Using this parabolic image, Jesus reveals a profoundly simple, yet defining characteristic about these ‘blessed people’ who will later be dining together in the Kingdom…

What is this simple, yet defining characteristic of the blessed? 

Well it is definitely not being the smartest, the richest, most articulate or socially connected in the community, that’s for sure…  Based on the parable, I believe it is simply their willingness and readiness to be used by God – right here and now – instead of waiting until later… In this reading, the key characteristic of ‘being blessed’ is having a willing and open heart that is centered on loving and building God’s Kingdom, instead of being focused on acquiring money, power, pleasure, success, etc.

This is why Jesus uses the examples of successful business persons needing to examine products and to complete purchases before coming to the Great Feast…   This is also why He uses the common example of newlyweds needing to attend to their spouse’s concerns before coming to the Great Feast…

…Both are examples of people with hearts that are so focused on, directed towards and consumed by their natural love(s), that these loves can hinder, enslave or even blind them from hearing, seeing and living out the FULLNESS of God’s call in life: to love God with all one’s heart, soul and mind and to love one’s neighbor as oneself.

In this parable, we see Augustine’s theology personified which talks about and defines sin as a warped natural loved, in which one inordinately loves the gift and not the Giver of gifts.

What are the take away messages from this Gospel?  

First, that even naturally good loves like successful businesses, families and marriages can possibly enslave and blind us from deepening our love of God and growing in holiness, if they are not loved correctly, that is, in God and through God.   The blessed know this and will guard their hearts choosing wisely what to love & how to love what they do, for they know that the heart is a doorway to the soul.

Second: in acknowledging that sometimes what we love and how we love are opposed to God’s will, we must learn how to let our heart and our loves be openly discussed, critiqued, shared and tried in the fire – of life by others and God.  Our heart open to love + time + relationships + grace =  a life that is purified, transformed and finally reflects God’s image to the world.  The blessed know instinctively that in offering their hearts and selves to the world, they will be broken and run over by many but saved in the end by Christ.

Finally, the last take away message from this parable is that ‘the blessed’ are NOT so because of the eternal reward they will receive in the Kingdom, but because of their willingness and ready hearts to struggle, work and to build God’s Kingdom here and now, each day.

Be Blessed!

So… You Want to be Rich, eh? Okay…

In Mark’s Gospel, we find Jesus saying the following:

“Children, how hard it is to enter the Kingdom of God!
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle
than for one who is rich to enter the Kingdom of God!”

                                                                         Mark 10: 24-25

Why is it so hard for the rich to enter the Kingdom of God?

For those of us who do not have a personal money tree in our backyard, perhaps it will be helpful to understand the word ‘rich’ in this scripture as not only referring to money, but also as being rich or having an abundance ‘of smarts, etc.’

The ‘rich’ in intellect are those gifted ‘with smarts’ and who naturally or often through study, reflection and/or advanced education, can ‘understand and know’ things that many others simply can not.  Being smart and intelligent is a gift from God, just like being athletic or very attractive: there are smart rich, middle class and poor folks as there are also very intelligent youth, middle aged and older folks.  So… what makes it so hard for ‘the smart and intelligent,’ to enter God’s Kingdom?

Well, speaking from personal experience… It is soooooooo very easy for those of us with an intellect to overly respect and to trust in it, believing that we actually know something that we don’t!!!  I’ve had many occasions of this false knowing – that is, believing I know fully about x, whatever x is – instead of humbly acknowledging the limitations of my intelligence.  This is especially true today, when a good hour of ‘internet study’ can make almost anyone feel like they are a scholar!!! Yes, I am smart – but my smarts are limited to certain areas or disciplines, as are the intellectual gifts of all people. No one knows everything!!!

Simply stated, it is easy for the naturally intelligent and educated professional to think they can easily understand and grasp certain things, especially if they are of a spiritual nature – like the spiritual life and scripture – simply because of one’s intelligence and gifts!  By our pride, we ‘intelligent and educated people’ can actually out think ourselves very easily, often failing realize just how spiritual truths  actually become  known and confirmed in life: by simply obeying and  living them out and rarely if ever by  understanding them only.  After all, who does not understand the Ten Commandments?   Has any been saved by that understanding without obeying and living them out?  Can any be saved simply by understanding Jesus’ Laws of Love?  That kind of unhealthy pride in and of our intellectual gifts, can make us an easy prey for the evil one…

This unhealthy kind of intellectual pride is often vocalized starting with the following, “…well, I believe and think that…” or “…well, from my study (of the Bible), I found that…”, etc.. Then, after pontificating about what s/he spiritually believes or knows, it is easy to move on and to explain why, based on that reason and understanding, one is also excused from simply and obediently following some part of God’s Law.  It’s no wonder, that Judas was arguably the smartest of the Apostles and also that hell is probably populated with a lot of naturally smart people…

It is true: a keen and quick business intelligence plus hard work can and does often lead many to become financially ‘rich’ in America. For some of these smart and successful business people, the selfish and low hanging fruit of vices like, becoming a ka-billionaire and living lives of wanton pleasure, are willfully chosen.  These financially  empowered choices can rapidly  shape  one’s  character and person, from being a humble child of God into being  a very powerful mean, selfish and unholy person!!!  For these, who are ‘richly’ blessed but choose to disregard God’s invitation to work for the higher and selfless fruits of serving and loving others, they can find it easier to have that ‘Camel pass through the eye of a needle than to enter the Kingdom of God’ – despite being doubly rich, with both intelligence and money!!!

In Mark’s Gospel he continues, explaining how upon hearing this the Apostles,

“…were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves,                      ‘Then who can be saved?’ Jesus looked at them and said,
“For men it is impossible, but not for God.                                                                  All things are possible for God.”

                                                                                                         Mark 10: 26-27

Today, I know many can quote and understand Jesus’ statement in Mk 10:24-5  literally and are not surprised by it at all, like the Apostles were upon originally hearing it. I wonder in my heart, how many now days can really understand and explore the true spiritual ‘richness’ of this verse, and in doing so, can also apply it  to the many different contexts that  make up their lives?

For instance, how many hardcore and conservative Catholics, who believe and have pride in our faith as the ‘fullness of the faith,’ truly understand that if this statement IS the truth, then how much more  will actually be required of us – as religiously and spiritually ‘rich’ Catholics?  It’s times like these, when I am especially grateful that “All things are possible for God.”

My prayer for all, is that as we grow to see and understand the varieties of ‘richness’ we are truly blessed with, that our willingness to love and  serve others will also grow…  In short, that the more we come to see and live out the richness gifted to us, the more we – by grace – will also become empowered to  give our rich gifts  away, especially to those who need them the most!

 

 

 

 

Whatz love got to do with it (Lent)?

The first Monday after Ash Wednesday…

Reading 1: LV 19:1-2, 11-18     Gospel: MT 25:31-46

          In today’s first reading, the Lord tells Moses to assemble the children of Israel and to instruct them to, “Be holy, for I, the Lord, your God, am holy.” Then the Lord gives Moses examples of His holiness, which includes living out the 10 Commandments in addition to a number of social laws that focused Israel on living justly as a community. Finally to summarize and seal His teaching, the Lord instructs Israel to “love your neighbor as yourself.” Many are surprised to find Jesus’ Law of Love stated so early – within the first five books of the Bible!

In the Gospel reading from Matthew chapter 25, we find one of the only readings where Jesus specifically addresses what the Last Judgment will be like, when the sheep will be finally separated from the goats on that Last Day. He lists how all those who fed the hungry, clothed the naked, visited the ill or those in prison – in short, all those who responded to the needs of others concretely with their gifts and talents – are those who will enter the kingdom. These are they who have met the mark and successfully loved correctly, Gospel Style, in their lives.

The word love gets both over and under used so much in our world today!!!

It is often under used in relationships by those needing to say and/or hear it… and it is clearly overused by the media who applies it to everything: from cartoon characters to candy bars!

There are good loves and bad loves in each of our lives… Whether good or bad, the love that reside in our hearts – must and will be expressed – in some manner, eventually…

Because the world’s great examples of natural love often seems so superficial and flawed, its no surprise that many doubt the existence of love, question its reality and seriously ponder whether it is just a natural and emotional reaction or really, as scripture says, the only lasting reality that grounds us in and with God.

Be not dismayed, nor loose hope about, the reality of love this Lent! Love is real!

Not only (and just as) is it better to have loved and lost, than to have never loved at all; SPIRITUALLY, it is also better to have sought after and tried to live like Love (GOD) – and to have fallen short, than choosing to never love anyone at all. Note: the former failed attempts to love as God loves can net us heaven, whereas never trying to love anyone at all can only net us hell.

>Real Love, like its Author and Ground, requires and demands a response to the other with our gifts and talents.

>Real Love is, as attentive to the needs of others, as it is to its own needs.

Real love, not the fake or philosophical kind (lol), seeks to reveal and give its self away through words, deeds or some sacrificial manner in response to the other.

What does love have to do with Lent?  It has EVERYTHING to do with Lent!  If Lent is about growing more holy, more God like and more loving – then our Lenten devotions and practices must eventually result in some measurable and demonstrable increase in our love of and for others.

This Lent, identify how you are trying to imitate, grow in the knowledge of and to deepen God’s love through your Lenten sacrifices and devotions. Be specific, i.e. – by giving up/adding xyz I am saving more time to do abc with my family, etc.. Start by listing what your Lenten sacrifices are for this year and then briefly explain how or why it will prompt you to better love both yourself and others in a more holy manner. If you can not explain how your Lenten devotions and sacrifices are going to make you a more loving and holy person, then perhaps your Lenten sacrifice needs some tweaking…

 

P.S. If you are making the same Lenten sacrifice each year, can you now look back and explain how/why it has prompted both real loving acts for others and also real growth in holiness for yourself? If not, who are you foolin’? Whereas Lent should prompt spiritual growth and development in one’s spiritual life, what kind of spiritual character are you really forming by these actions? As Arsenio Hall used to say, this is one of those “Things that make you (spiritually) go, hmmmmmmmm.”

 

 

How Our Temptations Mirror Jesus’

 

Jesus did not say, “Thou shalt not be troubled- thou shall not be tempted- thou shall not be distressed.  But He said: Thou shalt not be overcome.”

Julian of Norwich

This Sunday’s Gospel explores Jesus’ three temptations, after his baptism in the Jordan River. Jesus’ temptations mirrors our own daily temptations and also identifies two of the greatest challenges we face in the spiritual life: our bodily challenges and the challenges presented by the world.

Jesus’ and our first temptation, almost always starts with struggles surrounding the body. This temptation, symbolized by turning stones to bread, reflects the challenges we face as natural beings having physical bodies with needs to eat, sleep, touch, love and be in relationship with others, etc. Common struggles rooted in our physical bodies include not only the physical challenge to work and acquire the necessary resources for basic living, but also the moral challenges regarding how we choose to address and fulfill these needs – doing so in morally acceptable ways or not.

This first “test” and “temptation” reflects the initial stage of our prayer lives, when the spiritual journey seems to be comprised primarily of fighting: fighting to eliminate our sinful habits, to accept ourselves as sinners needing God, to build various virtues and to construct a holy character, to be in God’s presence and to develop a prayer life, etc. In this stage of the journey, the spiritual struggle is often felt in one’s very body, as the person now seeks to fast and deny themselves from past illicit sensual pleasures, etc.

Jesus’ second test, where he is tempted to throw himself down from the top of the temple allowing his angels to save him, is a test of the world.   This test reflects the second stage of the prayer life and spiritual journey. Whereas in the first stage of prayer, it seemed as if one was fighting with and in one’s body to break free of past worldly pleasures, practices and lifestyles that enslaved it, in the second stage one finds the fight has now shifted from within their body to against the world.   Now, after experiencing a measure of success in disciplining one’s self for the spiritual life, Satan parades in front of the pilgrim all that he or she has apparently chosen to give up: power, money and wealth, notoriety, being celebrated, etc. In this test, the invitation is for the person to finally, by grace, to abandon all the various worldly rewards and to seek God alone as their sole prize.

As we enter into Lent this year, seek to better understand how the evil one plans on tempting and attacking you this Lent. By understanding the how and why of the evil one’s attacks, you can better prepare to persevere and ‘fight the good fight’ this Lent.  Armed with better preparation and knowledge, our faith is strengthened and we can now stand on the hope that real changes are in store for us the Lent!!!

This Lent, be prepared for and expect the bodily suffering that accompanies the Lenten journey of fasting and prayer. This Lent, be prepared for and expect to be misunderstood and questioned by the world as you retreat from it to your inner garden to prayerfully be with God this Lent. Expect these crosses and more, as you follow Christ to Calvary this Lent. May God’s Holy Spirit lead and guide you through this Lenten Season!

Examining How God Teaches Us His Way in Prayer

 

Year A Cycle 1   Saturday after Ash Wednesday

Responsorial Psalm

PS 86:1-2, 3-4, 5-6

  1. (11ab) Teach me your way, O Lord, that I may walk in your truth.

 

The responsorial psalm for today’s readings gives us much hope as we begin our Lenten journey.

Teach me your way” reveals that God’s desire for us is to learn about and to grow in holiness, for God’s ways are always holy. This is what the Lenten journey is all about: growing in and living more like God – living a holier life. If God’s way is holy, then perhaps the most Gospel grounded way of expressing what holiness is in relationship and action, is that God’s way is the Way of Love. Choosing a common challenge for all, lets briefly examine how God teaches us His way and then, how it then leads or causes us to walk in God’s truth – Way of Love, via prayer…

Let’s say one’s goal for Lent is to learn how to speak and communicate more fully in God’s way – to communicate in a holier and more loving manner with others – how can one achieve such a lofty goal? Because one must certainly start with and turn to God for assistance in this matter, the the common Lenten invitation to spend more time in prayer can be applied to this goal. Why prayer? What does focusing on prayer and developing a prayer life have to do with my interpersonal communications with others?

Well, as one struggles to consistently pray and dialogue with God daily, one comes to know intimately, be led by and bathed in God’s Loving Spirit. In the midst of the struggle to pray throughout the day, God slowly teaches the soul His way about what holy communication really is! In that struggle, one comes to know very intimately the God of Love Who saves.

Bathed in that Love through the daily struggle to pray, over time the person is slowly transformed from inside out as old attitudes, perspectives and visions are gradually transformed and, by grace, are replaced with those of God. Somehow, by secretly strugglin’ seek Christ’s Light through prayer daily and integrate prayer into our day, all other relationships and communications become cast in that same Light of Christ and are seen anew.  New Gospel attitudes, perspectives and visions begin to emerge in one’s heart, which  spark with new hope, faith and loving response to the “same old situations and people” making up our lives.

As one’s prayer time monologues are slowly replaced with periods of listening to and dialoguing with God in prayer, one comes to know more clearly how God really communicates with all Creation… Seeing the importance of quietness and stillness in order to truly hear God, by grace, the person begins to cultivate these virtues in their life.   Increasingly bathed in the history of God’s Loving Responses, by grace and out of love, the person begins to imitate God’s quiet, gentle and loving way of expression with others

I suspect this is one major spiritual reason why many older people who have walked decades with God in prayer, are so respectful and kind to others: God has modeled it on the spiritual journey!

Through our prayerful struggle to know and communicate with the God of Love, we learn to love as we are loved, and are transformed by that Love into a saint – a holy reflection of God’s Love – who then spread the Love in community with others!

Communicating in God’s way can mean a lot of different things at many different times: from respectfully being silent to lovingly speaking the truth, from lovingly correcting a friend to pausing to thank or commend that same friend for being a blessing… or just being prayerfully present by another’s side in a time of crisis…   …these are all examples of God’s Loving way of communicating with others that we are called to imitate and live out this Lent….

Our Strugglin’Catholic.com Lenten Challenge going into this first Sunday of Lent is the following: Can you take whatever Lenten sacrifice you have chosen for this year and express it in terms of the Psalm? What are you asking God to teach you how to do in a holy manner this Lent? How and what would you like to walk more in God’s truth about?

By walking, talking and being closer to God in prayer this Lent, may the Holy Spirit teach each that unique lesson needed for right now in our journeys, that we may grow in holiness and walk more fully in God’s truth.

 

 

 

Martyrdom, Anyone?

A famous quote attributed to Tertullian states that “the blood of martyrs is the seed of the church.”   This quote speaks to how the real life sacrifices and martyrdoms that are faithfully suffered by Christians, often breathes new life, hope and charity into the community of believers. It testifies to the transformative power of God’s grace and love to draw others into the faith after witnessing another’s faithful suffering unto death.

Regarding Christian missions and ministry, martyrdom is rarely if ever one’s first or the most popular choice! Martyrdom in the classical and literal sense, leads directly to one’s bodily death and is usually accompanied and associated with much torture and long-suffering. Even after decades of Christian service and sacrifice, who can confidently say they would choose martyrdom, especially if their executioners gave them an opportunity to continue living for simply publically denouncing/renouncing their Christian faith (this is called apostacy)?

As Catholic American, few if any of us will find ourselves confronted with literal martyrdom and the challenge of apostacy, as many of our Middle Eastern brothers and sisters often do today.   Even so, as an America Catholic the reality and call to martyrdom may still eventually find its way into our lives as we journey towards the Kingdom of God. In as much as sin, evil and death is an inescapable part of human life, the path of martyrdom – even if not a literal death – will almost always somehow find its way into our lives via some form or another. What are some of the ways that martyrdom can surface in our lives as Americans?

Supporting a holy and just social issue: People actively work for just and holy social issues may find themselves experiencing some form of martyrdom because of their work. It can materialize in the form of quietly discontinued friendships or as a limiting of professional or academic opportunities by those who misunderstand or are outright opposed to their chosen social cause or issue. Some may even find themselves digitally or legally targeted and in the cross hairs of their opponent’s hired guns…

Living with illness: Living with and caring for a loved one with a serious illness or struggling to live with an illness oneself can also result in an experience of martyrdom. Caring for the ill requires a very real time, economic and emotional investment. Some illnesses in themselves – like cancer, mental illness or AIDS – carry the additional burden of misunderstanding and stigmatization, and can result in a very real loss/death in many different ways.

Specific kinds of vocational/work: Specific work choices, especially those service vocations requiring an inordinate amount of time, sacrifice or danger and which can spill over into the personal and family lives of the participants may yield martyrdom – especially in one’s personal and family lives. Common examples include the police officers, firefighters and physicians – people choosing these service vocations often experience a very real martyrdom, often in their personal relationships.

Faithfully living out Christian family and marital lives: Any Christian marriage and family seeking to publically live out and proclaim their faith in our contemporary secular society will undoubtedly experience some form of martyrdom at the hand of those who eschew, misunderstand or feel threatened by the religious and spiritual aspects of life.

Consistent and dedicated work at growing spiritually: Finally, any person who seriously embarks on and consistently undertakes the spiritual journey, seeking to grow in holiness through daily prayer, meditation and service will almost always experience a real personal martyrdom of their ego, as the Holy Spirit works to transform them from simply being good people to eventually becoming holy (and yes there is a difference). Responding to God’s call to grow in holiness will necessarily bring us personally to the Cross, which few, even those on the journey – willingly embrace.

It is easy to see how each of these life choices can result in a very real social martyrdom, martyrdom in personal relationships and even a personal/private martyrdom in one’s person.

Unlike the often short but horrific reality of literal martyrdom, these forms of martyrdom are often experienced over a long period of time and can extend to almost our whole lives.

Yes, the Gospel’s call to love, serve and bear the Cross awaits us daily. Whether immediate or long term, this call and invitation more often results in the martyrdoms of those who are willing to accept it.

Yes, our common call to bear our Cross is a common call to martyrdom.

Martyrdom, Anyone?

On John the Baptist & Contemporary American Beheading

speaking-truth-to-power

 

John the Baptist, who was imprisoned by Herod, was executed and martyred after a drunken Herod promised his beautiful stepdaughter anything that she wanted at the conclusion of her seductive dance before his friends at a banquet. In rereading the story (MK 6:14-29), one quickly realizes that Herod did not hate John the Baptist or want him killed – he realized John was a holy man and despite being “very much perplexed, he liked to listen to him.”

 

It was actually his wife, Herodias, who intensely hated and wanted John the Baptist killed because he publicly proclaimed the faith’s truth – that Herod’s marriage to his brother’s wife – was immoral! When her daughter shared Herod’s drunken promise and asked for advice, Herodias seized the opportunity to silence her detractor, John the Baptist, with execution.

In this story, a simple but powerful truth is revealed to any who will courageously seek to witness or proclaim the faith publically. John suffered mockery and ridicule, imprisonment and martyrdom – not for being a specific religion or denying another religion, but simply for courageously speaking an unpopular truth of the faith to power.

Jesus, John the Baptist and the Apostles were all born into a world very much like ours – where their religious values regarding marriage and human sexuality were not those of the mainstream culture. Multiple ways of understanding and living out human marriage and sexuality were practiced in the Roman world as it is today. Another historical reality shared between then and now is the way that the powerful and ungodly can use their power to ruthlessly punish and destroy those who courageously speak the faith’s counter cultural message of truth regarding marriage and human sexuality. As in the past, those who are courageous enough to speak these truths to the powerful – are often unaware or ignorant of those whom they have really offended and who have really ordered their execution.

Today in our secular and media driven world, these Herods’ and Herodias’ come in many different forms and can be found everywhere – not only outside but also inside of our Catholic Churches and institutions. Their undercover actions to silence and kill those courageously speaking the faith’s truth about marriage and human sexuality to power also takes many forms: from unjust lawsuits, firings and black listings to financially break and hush up the faithful who are poor and middle class, to all out media campaigns and public relation offensives against monied, orthodox and Christian individuals and institutions who publically take counter cultural stands proclaiming Christian truths regarding marriage and human sexuality. This is a fact: all who, by grace, courageously speak truth to power in history will suffer martyrdom – whether rich or poor.

In today’s secular world, there are a lot of John the Baptist walking around…

Since secularism allows all possible dialogue and discussion points in the public arena except those dealing with/grounded in faith, articulating Christian truths and arguments regarding marriage and sexuality – even if allowed Constitutionally – are simply ignored and omitted at best in public– if not openly disparaged, mocked or worse. When the worst parts of secularism surfaces, America’s freedom of speech simply no longer applies to stating Christian truths regarding marriage and human sexuality, which – even when stated simply and lovingly – are often still equated with the language of threats and hate.

For some, to believe in the traditional Christian teaching regarding marriage and human sexuality also means that that person is also completely incapable of living in a loving and respectful relationship with those choosing alternative lifestyles. This is an utter lie and a deceptively unhistorical belief which, in part, rests on highlighting the evil uses of religion historically and framing all possible future religious dialogue soley in terms of this very real but unfortunate lens. Note: we tend to do the very opposite with science and technology, ignoring its role in two World Wars while still proclaiming its ability to help and build humanity…

The reality of religious radicalism, hate and terrorism in our world shakes all of us to the core, yet equating whole religious traditions or any religiously grounded countercultural public dialogue with hate, ignorance and extremism is to choose – consciously or unconsciously- to ignorantly embody these very characteristics out of fear and to run from the real work of true change and growth through respectful dialogue and sacrifice. Such views often also fail to acknowledge that these same religious beliefs have given us the greatest examples – both individually and institutionally – of loving humanity that we have in history.

Yes, there are a lot of John the Baptists around today…

…even in this great country with its legal and historical traditions of free speech… As John the Baptist and many of today’s faithful have found out, courageous and faithful speech is not free – especially when aimed at the powerful. Speaking Gospel Truth comes with a cost, here in America as it did in Jesus’ times.

The downside of secularism for Catholics and Christians today, is that many Christians are willfully bludgeoning their Gospel call to evangelize in America, fearfully unable or unwilling to express the faith’s truths publically because of the very real risks. Like John the Baptist, they realize that there is a cost for courageously speaking Gospel truth to those who are powerful. I’m not sure this is the kind of America that the majority of Americans really wants for anybody…

John the Baptist and all who courageously follow in his steps are examples for us to follow today. Their example prepares and empowers us for that day, when we too will choose martyrdom, risking all by lovingly speaking the Christian truth about marriage and human sexuality in the face of very real power. By the grace we’ve received at baptism and the continuing power that we receive through the Eucharist, my prayer is that we can – in a loving manner – acknowledge, grapple with and publically dialogue about these hard truths regarding marriage and sexuality that God has challenged us with.

Yes, it is difficult and risky for most to speak and proclaim the faith’s truth about marriage and human sexuality publicly in America today…  Until you can do so lovingly in public, I propose starting with  Barry Sanders’ suggestion and accepting that initial challenge of seriously reflecting on, praying about and striving to live the faith’s truths about marriage and human sexuality in one’s own life…